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Download Aristoteles # Hughes, Philosophy Guidebook to Aristotle on by Gerard Hughes PDF

By Gerard Hughes

Hughes explains the most important components in Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics terminology and highlights the talk in regards to the interpretations of his writings. moreover, he examines the function that Aristotle's ethics proceed to play in modern ethical philosophy through evaluating and contrasting his perspectives with these broadly held at the present time.

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Because the original question is too coarse-grained. There are several different questions which we would do well to separate in our minds:6 (1) (2) (3) What activities does a fulfilled life contain? Which of these activities explains why a life is a fulfilled life? Which of the activities mentioned in (2) is the most worthwhile? Obviously, an answer to (1) will mention all kinds of activities, including brushing one’s teeth, going shopping, paying bills, catching trains and taking the dog for a walk, as well as what we might think of as ‘higher’ activities like spending time with one’s friends, or enjoying the company of one’s family, studying philosophy, or doing voluntary work in the local hospital.

Which of these activities explains why a life is a fulfilled life? Which of the activities mentioned in (2) is the most worthwhile? Obviously, an answer to (1) will mention all kinds of activities, including brushing one’s teeth, going shopping, paying bills, catching trains and taking the dog for a walk, as well as what we might think of as ‘higher’ activities like spending time with one’s friends, or enjoying the company of one’s family, studying philosophy, or doing voluntary work in the local hospital.

4 (1097b28–33), might be to say that if he means to ask whether there 5 are any human activities which other organisms cannot perform, then 6 the answer is that there seem to be many characteristically human activ7 ities: thinking, playing chess, giving to charity, embezzling money, 8 lying, breaking promises, conducting genetic research. A very mixed 9 bag, one might think. 16 At the very least, then, his view of 14 what is characteristically human is extremely inexact. 15 Aristotle, in reply to this, would start by flatly denying that 16 animals can think.

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